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Most recent articles from Rasmussen Reports
  1. Most Get Information About Candidates From the News

    This election season, most voters are turning to the news to get information about candidates, but some still turn to other sources.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 68% of Likely U.S. Voters get most of their information about a political candidate from news reports. Thirteen percent (13%) get most of their information from debates, while seven percent (7%) each rely most on political advertising or family and friends. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project. Learn more about how you can contribute.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 15-16, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  2. Despite Bankruptcy, Americans Still Like Sears

    Sears joins a growing list of retail giants to file for bankruptcy, as Americans continue to gravitate to online shopping outlets such as Amazon. Still, most Americans like Sears and have purchased an item from the department store at some point in their lives.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 59% of American Adults have at least a Somewhat Favorable impression of Sears, Roebuck and Co., including 18% who have a Very Favorable opinion. Twenty-three percent (23%) view Sears unfavorably, but only five percent (5%) have a Very Unfavorable view of the store. Eighteen percent (18%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project.  Learn more about how you can contribute.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 American Adults was conducted on October 15-16, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  3. Daily Presidential Tracking Poll

    The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Thursday shows that 47% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Trump’s job performance. Fifty-two percent (52%) disapprove. 

    The latest figures include 34% who Strongly Approve of the way Trump is performing and 43% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of -9. (see trends).

    Regular updates are posted Monday through Friday at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily email update).

    Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project. Learn more about how you can contribute

    Now that Gallup has quit the field, Rasmussen Reports is the only nationally recognized public opinion firm that still tracks President Trump's job approval ratings on a daily basis. If your organization is interested in a weekly or longer sponsorship of Rasmussen Reports' Daily Presidential Tracking Poll, please send e-mail to  beth@rasmussenreports.com .

  4. Do Voters See Value in Debates?

    While almost half of voters have watched at least one candidate debate this midterm election season, they’re split on whether those debates carry any value for them.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 46% of Likely U.S. Voters have watched candidate debates this campaign season, while 49% have not watched any. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project. Learn more about how you can contribute.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 15-16, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  5. The Drive for 25: An updated seat-by-seat analysis of the House By Kyle Kondik

    Democrats closing in on majority but it's not a sure thing.

  6. Voters Like Melania Trump a Bit More These Days

    Following her first major trip to Africa as First Lady, Melania Trump has earned some more fans.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 59% of Likely U.S. Voters now have at least a somewhat favorable opinion of First Lady Melania Trump, including 39% with a Very Favorable opinion of her. This is up from 53% who viewed her favorably at the end of 2017 and 45% just after the 2016 election.

    Thirty-three percent (33%) now view Mrs. Trump unfavorably, including 14% with a Very Unfavorable opinion of her. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project.  Learn more about how you can contribute.

    (Want a  free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on October 11 & 14, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology

  7. Voters Say Democrats Likely to Win House, Not Senate

    Most voters think Democrats are likely to take charge of the House of Representatives following next month’s elections but expect them to fall short of capturing the Senate, too.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 56% of Likely U.S. Voters believe Democrats are likely to win control of the House, with 23% who say it’s Very Likely. Thirty-seven percent (37%) consider a Democratic takeover unlikely, but that includes just 12% who say it’s Not At All Likely. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project.  Learn more about how you can contribute.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 15-16, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  8. Sinking Sleaze-Bob Menendez By Michelle Malkin

    The metaphors don't get any better (or worse) than this:

  9. Generic Congressional Ballot Tied Again This Week

    With less than three weeks to Election Day, Democrats and Republicans remain in a near tie on the Generic Congressional Ballot.

    Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project. Learn more about how you can contribute.  

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 2,500 Likely Voters was conducted on October 7-11, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 2 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  10. Shut Up, They Explain By John Stossel

    Gloria Alvarez, the young woman from Guatemala I wrote about last week, just got blocked by Facebook. Why? Because she criticizes socialism.

    After Alvarez joined me in my American studio to make a video we titled "Socialism Fails Every Time," she flew to Mexico City to make a speech.